August 2017

August 16, 2017

August 16th - Statement on Health Care For All's Commitment to Combating Injustice

(Boston, MA) - " Health Care For All is a social justice organization committed to defending the rights of all people to affordable, quality health care regardless of race, religion or gender identity. We condemn the violence and fear mongering propagated by hate groups this past weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, as well as any discussions that stop short of calling out acts of discrimination and hatred for what they truly are.

"The effects of fear, racism and discriminatory policies have drastic and negative impacts on the health and well-being of some of our most vulnerable communities. Health Care For All is committed to combating racial disparities and injustice, and we will continue to promote inclusion, equity and compassion as both an organization and as a group of citizens working to protect the rights of all people in every way we can."

August 2, 2017

State Senate Majority Leader Harriette Chandler of Worcester, co-chair of the Massachusetts Legislature’s Oral Health Caucus, is a longtime advocate for oral health and a strong supporter of Health Care For All. Today, she published an op-ed in the Worcester Telegram and Gazette. In her article, Senator Chandler highlights the barriers currently preventing many Massachusetts residents from accessing necessary oral health care services, and encourages the state legislature to take action to address these issues. We are deeply grateful to Senator Chandler for her ongoing leadership on all health care issues, particularly her deep devotion to improved oral health. Here is her op-ed:

As I See It: Closing MassHealth gap in oral health coverage

First as a representative and later as the senator for the First Worcester District, one of my priorities has always been to make sure that people have access to the health care they need and deserve. I know that many are paying close attention to what’s happening in Washington where the future of the Affordable Care Act is on the line – and with it the access to insurance and care for hundreds of thousands of residents of the Commonwealth. We are all worried, yet access to coverage doesn’t solve all the health care problems we face in the state.

There are many other battles that we need to fight to ensure that people can get the treatments and preventive care they need. Even with more than 97 percent of the Massachusetts population covered by medical insurance, many still struggle to access oral health care – which is just as important. They struggle because our fragmented system of care separates the mouth from the rest of the body. For too many, health coverage stops short of comprehensive dental care. Quite simply for them, dental services are out of reach.

Those who are lucky have two insurance cards: one to see a medical doctor and another to see a dentist. However, even with the right card, many people cannot afford the out-of-pocket expenses that accompany much needed dental services, leading many to forego this care altogether.

I recently read an “As I See It” column published in this section written by a well-respected member of our community highlighting the challenges immigrants face when accessing oral health services. In her article, Anh Sawyer, executive director of the Southeast Asian Coalition, rightfully points out the need for increased awareness and for better integration of services, although cost remains a problem.

I agree. Educating consumers about the link between oral health and chronic conditions is critical.

Under the Affordable Care Act, Massachusetts has expanded Medicaid through the MassHealth system. The new MassHealth Accountable Care Organizations are a great opportunity to integrate dental and medical services. ACOs focus on community health, and are expected to lower prices and incentivize a healthier population. However, we must do more. I see people around Worcester every day facing high barriers to getting the care they need, especially those with limited resources. Many dentists don’t accept MassHealth due to low reimbursements. Even if they can find a dentist, many critical services are not covered because of previous state budget cuts.

MassHealth has progressively restored dental benefits, piece by piece, since they were stripped a decade ago. Yet today, 800,000 individuals – including 120,000 seniors and 180,000 people living with disabilities – still do not have coverage for the treatment of gum disease, known as periodontal treatment. They also lack coverage for specific services like root canal treatments (endodontic services), crowns and bridges (prosthodontic services), and some oral surgery procedures such as the removal of benign lesions, which are currently only available to MassHealth members under age 21 or those who are eligible for Department of Developmental Services. Unfortunately, the lack of comprehensive adult dental coverage (which would include all of the services just noted) leads to pain, tooth loss and preventable high-cost emergency department usage, to name a few.

We need to restore those benefits as soon as possible, as they are causing needless pain, suffering, and illness. The legislature has an opportunity to start the process now. I am pleased that the provision to prepare a schedule and cost estimate for restoring MassHealth adult dental care was approved as part of the final Fiscal Year 18 state budget. In addition, Representative John Scibak and I filed legislation to effectively restore all full dental benefits for adults on MassHealth. He and I also co-chair the Legislature’s Oral Health Caucus – the first such legislative caucus in the nation, focusing solely on oral health issues.

August 2, 2017

Yesterday, the D.C. Circuit Court granted the motion of Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey and 15 other state attorneys general to intervene in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) cost-sharing reduction (CSR) lawsuit. We truly appreciate the Massachusetts Attorney General’s work on this, and we are proud of our HCFA HelpLine Director Hannah Frigand, whose affidavit submitted to the court helped prove a dispositive issue, that states could intervene because residents would be harmed by the increase in premium costs that would flow from the termination of CSRs.

AG Healey issued a statement on the importance of this case:

The D.C. Circuit Court’s ruling is a win for states and a major hit to the Trump Administration’s efforts to sabotage the Affordable Care Act. With the court’s decision, the states won the right to defend payments that help millions of Americans access affordable health insurance. As long as the Trump Administration keeps playing politics with the health of our residents, we will be there to defend access to care in Massachusetts and across the country.

As in other cases, the court took note of “accumulating public statements” by the Trump Administration threatening to withdraw from the litigation and eliminate CSRs, and so the states were permitted to intervene to protect the public interest.

Although the ACA requires insurers to provide discounts on cost-sharing (i.e., deductibles, co-pays, co-insurance), CSRs are critical to reimburse the health plans for these discounts, keeping health insurance affordable. This is particularly important for those who are not eligible for premium assistance. Their elimination would drastically increase the price of health insurance and, as a result, the uninsured rate would climb. The states demonstrated to the court that this would present a substantial monetary burden on states. After all, state-funded hospitals must provide emergency care for individuals regardless of their coverage status or ability to pay.

So while the war to maintain the ACA and improve market stability continues, we are reassured by the tireless Massachusetts Attorney General, Maura Healey, whose work helped ensure that consumer advocates will not go down without a fight.

                                                                                                                                                                          - Ben Agatston