July 2018

July 16, 2018

Health Care For All, along with MassPIRG, Health Law Advocates, Community Catalyst and the Massachusetts Senior Action Council recently wrote a letter on the issue of drug transparency to the conferees meeting to work out a final health care bill. We urged the Conference Committee to include strong transparency measures to help tackle the problem of skyrocketing prescription drug prices.

Prescription drug costs are currently the fastest growing healthcare expense – by far. For both public and private plans, increases in pharmacy costs far outpace every other expense. Rising drug prices are increasing health care costs, placing significant burden on consumers and putting pressure on the state budget.

A major obstacle in controlling drug price growth is a lack of transparency on pricing trends, rebates, discounts, and pharmaceutical benefit managers. Actual prices paid for drugs are hidden behind a complex veil of intermediaries, and effective transparency provisions would allow the public and policymakers to understand the causes of high prices and cost growth.

We urge the Conference Committee to adopt the Senate language, which provide for more extensive disclosures and would strengthen the ability of policymakers and the public to judge if we are getting good value for our billions spent on prescription drugs. We believe that Massachusetts should join a number of other states that have enacted strong transparency requirements to further the goals of affordable care.

If you are interested in understanding the extent of these factors, read the complete letter here.

-Louis Pratt

July 10, 2018

With both the House and Senate having passed ambitious health care bills this session, now a joint House-Senate conference committee is hammering out the differences to reconcile the two bills for final passage. Health Care For All recently provided comments to the legislature on our recommendations for provisions  to reduce health care costs, protect consumers, and strengthen our state’s health care system.

While Massachusetts has the highest insurance coverage rate in the country, there is still progress to be made to improve the quality and affordability of health care in the Commonwealth. Some of the reforms that HCFA believes are important which were included in both the House and Senate bills are:

  • establishing an academic detailing program to provide independent evidence-based education that focuses on the therapeutic and cost-effective utilization of prescription drugs;
  • requiring the Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) to develop and adopt a uniform methodology to communicate information on how health care providers are assigned to tiers;
  • requiring pharmacies to charge consumers the off-the-shelf price (the price people would pay with no insurance) if it is lower than their copay;
  • requiring insurers to continue coverage past age 26 for dependents with substantial disabilities.

For our full letter to the Conference Committee with detailed explanations of our positions, please click here. Here are summaries of HCFA’s recommendations regarding the legislation: