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Center For Children and Families releases report: “Nation’s Progress on Children’s Health Coverage Reverses Course”

Center For Children and Families releases report: “Nation’s Progress on Children’s Health Coverage Reverses Course”

December 5, 2018

In 2016, the rate of uninsured children in the United States hit an historic low of 4.7 percent. In a report released last week, the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute’s Center for Children and Families finds that number increased to 5 percent in 2017, marking the first rise in the number of uninsured children nationally since comparable data was first collected nearly a decade ago. 

Here in Massachusetts, we boast an uninsured rate significantly lower than the national numbers. Nevertheless, this report gives us pause because it shows that the Commonwealth joined eight other states in experiencing a statistically significant increase in its rate of uninsured children, with the numbers increasing by 0.5% from 15,000 children in 2016 to 22,000 children in 2017. The reasons for this are not clear, but the findings should be a wake-up call to all of us.

Nationally, the report attributes these shifts in large part to “strong national currents” that include the ultimately unsuccessful effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and cap federal Medicaid funding, a Congressional delay that caused a temporary lapse in funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and efforts to undermine ACA Marketplaces which includes reducing outreach and enrollment grants as well as shortening the enrollment period. The authors caution that “…there is every reason to believe the decline in coverage is likely to continue and may get worse in 2018.” At the heart of this warning is worry about the recently proposed changes to the federal “public charge” rule which creates new tests on income and use of public benefits for lawfully present immigrants seeking to adjust their immigration status. The report cites a recent study that found that “implementation of the proposed rule could lead to a reduction in Medicaid enrollment of between 2.1 million to 4.9 people and posits the likelihood that children would “make up the majority who are disenrolled.”

At Health Care For All, we know that health insurance coverage is at the foundation of ensuring that children can access the health care services they need to grow, learn and thrive. Massachusetts is doing well, but we must remain vigilant in our efforts to enroll children and families in high-quality, affordable coverage and to protect, improve and expand the coverage that is available.
 
Our efforts must include active and vocal opposition to the proposed changes to the public charge rule during the public comment period. Join us now by learning more about the proposed changes and submitting your own comment of opposition before December 10th.

-Natalie Litton