A Healthy Blog

Massachusetts health care — wonky, with a healthy dose of reality

Governor Signs Budget Funding Health Care Needs

Governor Signs Budget Funding Health Care Needs

July 26, 2018

health care budget

Governor Baker signed the state budget for Fiscal Year 2019 today. The budget funds state programs and also includes numerous policy changes. Massachusetts budget procedures allow the Governor to veto specific provisions of the budget However, for the most part, the Governor did not veto our key health care priorities.

We are very pleased that the budget does not call for cuts in MassHealth or other state-funded health programs, and adds a new periodontal (gum care) dental benefit for adults in MassHealth.

Here are some of the issues that we have been working on that were included in the budget signed today:

  • Restore coverage for periodontal care for adults on MassHealth – the budget provides for periodontal (gum care) benefits to be provided to adults in the MassHealth program effective June 1 of 2019. Coverage for the treatment of periodontal disease is critical to improving the oral and general health of the adult population.  
  • Establish an Office of Health Equity within EOHHS – the budget includes a long-standing HCFA priority by funding a permanent, codified Office of Health Equity that would work to improve the health of racial and ethnic minority populations in the Commonwealth by establishing statewide goals and a plan to meet those goals. The Office would coordinate resources throughout state government, as well as evaluate the effectiveness of statewide and regional programs.
  • Direct MassHealth to provide information on ACO outcomes and activities addressing social determinants of health – MassHealth ACOs will be responsible for screening their 800,000 members for health-related social needs, such as housing insecurity, food insecurity, transportation needs, and exposure to violence – issues directly related to poor health outcomes, health inequities and high health care costs. This provision directs MassHealth to report on the impact of the ACO program, including data concerning screening and interventions related to the social determinants of health.
  • Fund critical children’s mental health programs, including the Mental Health Advocacy Program for Kids (MHAP for Kids) and Return to School “Bridge” programs – the MHAP for Kids program improves the mental health of vulnerable youth who have been diverted from juvenile court or are already court-involved and have unmet mental health needs by providing these children with a legal advocate trained in removing barriers to treatment. Return to School “Bridge” programs ensure that youth who have been out of school for psychiatric or other hospitalizations can successfully transition back to school.
  • Fund pediatric palliative care programs – these programs provide invaluable services to over 344 ill children and their families, including consultation for pain and symptom management, nursing care, case management, social services, counseling, volunteer support, respite, complimentary therapies and bereavement services for families.

In signing the budget, the Governor vetoed several provisions that we prioritized. The vetoes included funding for the “academic detailing” program, which is an evidence-based prescriber education program on the therapeutic and cost-effective utilization of prescription drugs. The program helps doctors make decisions based on balanced research data rather than biased promotional information.

The Governor also proposed to cut in half the the $300,000 allocated to the ForsythKids program. This program provides preventive oral health services for kids in 51 schools to provide school-based oral health care.

We will be calling on the legislature to override both of these vetoes.

The Governor also returned a section of the bill with a request that the legislature amend the provision. The issue is prescription drug discount “coupons.” Drug companies use these to entice consumers into purchasing more expensive brand-name drugs, often when cheaper and equally-effective alternatives are available. When the coupons run out, patients are left with high copays. Massachusetts originally banned these coupons, then temporarily authorized them several years ago. The budget provision, which HCFA opposed, would have extended permission for these coupons until 2021. The Governor’s requested amendment would limit the extension just to 2020, and set up a study to make recommendations on the issue. HCFA supports the Governor’s request.

With the budget completed, eyes now turn to the big health care package still pending before a House-Senate conference committee. The legislature adjourns at midnight (more or less) on July 31, so there's not much time left to complete work on the bill.

                                                                                                           -- Brian Rosman