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Massachusetts health care – wonky with a dose of reality

January 26, 2018

The high cost of prescription drugs is a familiar story to consumers across America who struggle to pay for the medication on which they depend in order to get and stay well. The state's Health Polcy Commission found that prescription drug costs continue to be the fast rising cause of our state health care cost growth:

As consumers across the country rang in 2018, many prescription drug companies announced that the new year would see price increases for dozens of drugs. Effective January 1st, pharmaceutical companies Allergan, Teva, Collectis, Insys, Sysnergy and Supernus all raised prices on drugs that treat a wide range of conditions including hypertension, dry eye, irritable bowel syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease.

While this news may seem par for the course, consider the details. In 2016, a number of pharmaceutical executives pledged to keep price increases below 10%. Allergan chief executive Brent Saunders, for example, made this promise as part of his company’s “social contract” with patients. These companies touted a promise to limit price increases to "single digits."

This makes the rate of 2018 price increases particularly interesting:

  • Allergan is increasing the price on at least 18 medications—including its dry eye drug Restasis, irritable bowel syndrome medication Linzess, hypertension treatment Bystolic, and Alzheimer’s treatment Namenda XR—all by 9.5%.
  • Amgen is increasing the price on its top-selling rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis treatment Enbrel by 9.7%.
  • Biogen is increasing the prices of its multiple sclerosis medications Tecfidera and Avonex/Plegridy by 8% each.
  • Horizon Pharma is increasing the prices of four medications – all by 9.9%.
  • Teva is raising prices on seven medications at rates ranging from 2.3% to 9.4%.

A pattern quickly emerges: drug company price increases continue to squeeze consumers, but by staying below 10%, their executives are adhering to their self-imposed limits … just barely.

We're not fooled. HCFA continues to call on the legislature to enact strong drug pricing transparency and other laws to control unconscionable drug prices. The state Senate included a provision forcing drug companies to transparently justify exorbitant prices as part of its health care reform package. That bill is now pending before the House, and is expected to come up in the next few months. We urge the House to follow suit, and do something about high drug prices.

                                                                                                                                            -Natalie Litton
 

 

January 3, 2018

CHIA 2017 Health Insurance Survey Highlights

The recently released 2017 Massachusetts Health Insurance Survey from the Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) found that at only 3.7 percent, the uninsurance rate in the Commonwealth remains well below the rest of the nation. Nevertheless, insurance coverage does not automatically translate into health care access, and with nearly one in ten Massachusetts residents underinsured, it is clear there is more to the story of Bay Staters’ ability to get the care they need when they need it.

CHIA considers survey respondents “underinsured” if they had health insurance coverage all year but spent 10 percent or more of their family income on family out-of-pocket health care expenses in the past twelve months. More than 12 percent of respondents over age 65 fell were considered underinsured, compared to 8.2 percent of non-elderly adults and 8 percent of children up to age 18. CHIA reports that the statewide underinsurance rate was 8.8 percent.

High co-pays and deductibles along with services that simply aren’t covered by their insurance cause Massachusetts’ underinsured to delay and avoid receiving the care they need. Over a quarter of respondents reported an unmet need for medical or dental care in the past 12 months due to cost. Proving the point that coverage does not ensure access, CHIA reports that 65.2 percent of these respondents had health insurance at the time. Furthermore, 78 percent of respondents with medical debt had incurred all medical bills while they and their family were insured.

While we can be proud of the progress made since passage of the Commonwealth’s universal health coverage law in 2006, it is clear that even with health insurance coverage, cost remains a barrier to the health care that makes and keeps us well.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                 -Natalie Litton

December 8, 2017

Governor Baker, along with the governors of Oregon, Montana, and Nevada, today published an op-ed in the New York Times urging Congress to reauthorize funding the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the program that provides health coverage to almost nine million children of low-income families across the country. The op-ed emphasized the benefits to kids’ health that CHIP has brought about since its creation in 1997 and the disastrous consequences of allowing the program to expire.

“Since the program went into effect, the percentage of children who are uninsured has dropped from 15 percent to 5.3 percent. Children who would otherwise be uninsured can now visit doctors for the regular checkups all kids should have and get the treatment they need when they’re sick or hurt, whether they’re suffering from a sore throat, a broken bone or a life-threatening illness. CHIP doesn’t just provide insurance coverage for children — it indirectly provides financial stability for many working families who depend on the program to cover their children’s health care. Many of them would otherwise be financially devastated by their kids’ hospital bills.”

Funding for CHIP expired at the end of September, and states will soon run out of the reserve funds they have been using to continue the program. In Massachusetts, CHIP provides coverage for 172,000 children. The Commonwealth will lose $295 million in federal funding if CHIP is not reauthorized. Coverage for many would be at risk, and losing federal funding for the program will be a major blow to the state’s budget. 

Governor Baker has taken a leading role in advocating for the reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program and for community health centers. Federal funding for community health centers also expired at the end of September. In Massachusetts, community health centers provide primary care to about one million residents, or about one seventh of the state’s population.    

Governor Baker and Oregon’s Governor Brown sent a letter to Congress at the end of November asking for reauthorization of CHIP, funding for community health centers, and funding for a federal home visiting program. The letter explained how, even if CHIP funding is ultimately reauthorized, the delay in funding is already causing harm.

“Absent congressional action, states will be forced to take steps including the notification of thousands of families of the loss of CHIP health care coverage. Taking steps to avoid those worst-case outcomes places a tremendous administrative and financial burden on states and sows confusion among vulnerable populations.”

Health Care For All thanks Governor Baker for his consistent advocacy on behalf of these vital programs.

November 20, 2017

Funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expired on September 30. CHIP provides health insurance for children and pregnant mothers who are low-income but are not eligible for Medicaid. States have a limited amount of funds left to maintain the program, but without federal reauthorization, these funds will soon run out. CHIP has been responsible for a massive decrease in the number of uninsured children throughout the country. When CHIP became law in 1997, 14 percent of people below the age of 18 were uninsured. By 2015, this number had decreased to less than 5 percent. In Massachusetts, CHIP covers about 160,000 children, including 7,000 expecting mothers. CHIP has helped the Commonwealth reach the incredible rate of 99 percent insurance coverage for children, which is the highest in the nation. According to updated estimates provided by MassHealth, without Congressional action, Massachusetts will exhaust its federal CHIP funding in mid-January.

Federal funding for community health centers expired on the same day. Community health centers are a vital part of the health care system, and a lack of federal funding will throw these health centers into a finical crisis, affecting a massive portion of the population. Many community health centers, uncertain when funding may reauthorized, are already experiencing considerable financial stress, which is hampering their ability to function effectively. In Massachusetts, community health centers provide primary care to one in seven state residents, or about 1 million people. Community health centers tend to serve large amounts of patients without private insurance, including those covered through Medicaid and those who are uninsured. The most vulnerable members of our society will be disproportionately affected if community health centers are forced to cut services due to a lack of federal funding.

Senator Elizabeth Warren recently posted a video calling for the reauthorization of funds for both CHIP and community health centers. Health Care For All commends Senator Warren for her commitment in fighting for these vital programs. HCFA calls on Congress to work together to forge a clean bipartisan agreement on funding of both CHIP and community health centers, two essential components of our health care system. 

November 17, 2017

Last week, the state Senate considered over 150 amendments proposed to their comprehensive health care cost control package, titled the HEALTH Act, for Health Empowerment and Affordability while Leveraging Transformative Health care (see our initial thoughts on the bill here). After spending two full days discussing and voting on amendments, the Senate approved the bill right at midnight on November 9. The final Senate bill, incorporating all the amendments, is expected to be numbered S. 2211, and so should be available online here.

The wide-ranging final bill includes over 150 sections, concerning many aspects of the state’s health care system. The bill now goes to the House. House leaders have said they will be reviewing the bill and preparing their version sometime in the new year.

HCFA was active during the amendment process, working on a number of proposed improvements to the bill. As you can see from the brief summaries below, among the many provisions are a number of long-standing HCFA priorities. Below is an outline of some of the key issues included in the bill; we apologize for the length, but this is a very large bill.

MassHealth reforms: We are thankful to the Senate for not including a package of proposed reforms to MassHealth that reduces eligibility for non-disabled adults which would limit benefits and impose barriers to keeping coverage and continuity of care. Most of these proposals also need federal approval; the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is currently reviewing the 1115 waiver amendment Massachusetts submitted in September.

Oral Health: The bill allows dental therapists to practice in Massachusetts. Allowing dental therapists to work in Massachusetts would expand access to oral health. Low income children and families, older adults, people with disabilities and communities of color face the substantial barriers to accessing needed dental care. Dental therapists are licensed midlevel dental providers, working under a dentist’s supervision. As community-based providers who understand the history, culture, and language of their patients, they enable the dental team to deliver culturally competent, patient-centered care, mobilizing the strengths of underserved communities. Dental therapists could bring much needed care to underserved people and address oral health disparities.

Academic detailing: The Senate bill requires the Health Policy Commission to implement Academic Detailing, which is an evidence-based prescriber education program that focuses on the therapeutic and cost-effective utilization of prescription drugs. Academic Detailing supports prescribers to make informed decisions based on balanced research data rather than biased promotional information from drug companies. The Senate considered an amendment supported by HCFA that would have included an assessment on pharmaceutical companies to fund the program, but this amendment was not adopted.

Prevention: The Senate bill renews authorization for the Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund (PWTF) , which expired in June. PWTF is an innovative approach to address social determinants of health. It was set up as a pilot program in 2012, with the goal of reducing health costs by increasing access to community-based prevention. The pilot phase focused on hypertension, childhood asthma, elderly falls and tobacco use reduction, and operated in nine communities. PWTF is unique in addressing community factors that lead to poor health. HCFA worked with other public health advocates to add a funding mechanism to the provision, which originally had no source of funds. An amendment to the bill increases the tax on flavored cigars to fund the program.

Medicare Savings Programs: The Senate considered an amendment filed by Senator L’Italien that would leverage federal and existing state funds to expand eligibility to Medicare Savings Programs (MSPs), which help lower costs for Medicare beneficiaries with limited incomes. In the end, the Senate approved a redrafted amendment that directs the Executive Office of Elder Affairs and the Executive Office of Health and Human Services to develop plans to utilize Prescription Advantage program funding and expand MSPs, respectively, by September 2018.

Prescription Drug Price Transparency: The Senate bill includes a number of provisions to increase transparency of prescription drug pricing. The bill requires the Center for Health Information and Analysis to collect pricing information from pharmaceutical manufacturers and pharmacy benefit managers, including research and development costs, marketing and advertising costs and annual profits. The bill also requires these entities to take part in the Health Policy Commission’s annual health cost trends hearings where the Commission can solicit sworn testimony from the industry on factors driving drug price increases. An amendment supported by HCFA strengthened the reporting requirements and allows the Attorney General to compel pricing information from industry officials, subject to a financial penalty and other legal action for noncompliance.

November 16, 2017

The Massachusetts legislature recently passed legislation, called the Contraceptive ACCESS bill, to ensure access to birth control in Massachusetts. The bill now needs the signature of the Governor to become law.

The Affordable Care Act mandates coverage of birth control without copayments. However, the Trump administration recently moved to roll back this requirement by allowing employers to request exemptions from this requirement based on religious or moral beliefs. This could result in some employers choosing to no longer cover birth control in the insurance plans they offer to workers.

The ACCESS bill ensures that, even with this action on the federal level, employers in Massachusetts will continue to provide employees with coverage for birth control without copayments.

This bill also increases access to birth control in several other ways. It allows women to receive a 12- month supply of oral contraceptives at once, instead of requiring women to repeatedly return to the pharmacy to renew their prescription throughout the year.

This legislation further allows for women to access emergency contraception without a copayment or new prescription, which is vital to ensure timely access. Before this legislation, a woman would need to get a prescription to receive emergency contraception without a copayment. Emergency contraception is meant to be taken immediately, so being forced to wait for a prescription could undermine the effectiveness of the medication.

Access to contraception is critical to the health and wellbeing of women and their families. Health Care For All believes birth control should be available to all who need it, regardless of economic status. HCFA supports this legislation as a measure to increase access to birth control in Massachusetts and to protect against attacks on access to affordable birth control from the federal level.  

(Image courtesy of NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts

November 14, 2017

Despite being completely preventable, dental disease is a major cause of illness in the US. Millions suffer from painful untreated dental issues due to an inability to access dental care, which impacts their ability to eat, talk, gain or retain employment and maintain good overall health. Low income children and families, older adults, people with disabilities and communities of color face the greatest barriers to accessing care.

Dental access is a severe problem in Massachusetts. A 2016 Massachusetts Health Policy Commission study highlighted the severe access problem for low-income people. It found that only 56% of low-income adults saw a dentist in the past year, compared to 82% of high-income adults.

The lack of access to dental care is also evidenced by the large number of ER visits for preventable dental issues. In Massachusetts, for example, ER use by children covered by Medicaid for preventable oral health conditions was 3.4 times that for kids with commercial coverage. For non-elderly adults, the rate of ER visits by Medicaid members was a stunning 16.6 times that of those with commercial coverage.

These disparities affect many – adults of color, people with disabilities and older adult communities face significant social, structural, cultural, economic and geographic barriers in accessing care and have high rates of oral health problems.  The current dental delivery system is not overcoming these barriers. This is why health care advocates across the country keep pushing to add dental therapists, licensed midlevel dental providers to the dental team. Dental therapists could immediately bring care to millions of underserved people nationwide and address oral health disparities.  In Massachusetts, the Senate’s recently passed health care bill includes authorization for dental therapists.

Dental therapists work with the dental team similar to the way physician assistants work on the medical team—they are early intervention and prevention dental professionals who are trained to provide a limited scope of services under the supervision of a dentist. They have been working worldwide since the 1920s and have been part of the US dental team for over a decade. Specifically designed to work in underserved areas, dental therapists are practicing safely, effectively and increasing access to care in Alaska, Minnesota, and the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community in Washington, and were also recently authorized in Vermont and Maine.

Several dental therapy programs are recruiting providers directly from the communities where oral health needs are the greatest. Utilizing community-based providers who understand the history, culture, and language of their patients enables the dental team to deliver culturally competent, patient-centered care and mobilizes the strengths of underserved communities.

In addition to delivering patient centered care, dental therapists are proving to relieve the financial burden on dental practices who have limited resources for oral health services for vulnerable and underserved populations. Since dental therapists are less expensive to hire, dental practices are able to provide care for more Medicaid patients, even with lower reimbursement rates, and still be profitable. These are critical components to being able to remove some of the systemic barriers that prevent underserved communities from accessing dental services, and building the community’s health care delivery capacity to improve oral health outcomes.

Access to dental services and good oral health should not be treated as novelties reserved for those lucky enough to live near a dentist, have dental insurance and afford to receive treatment. These are critical components to overall good health, and it is imperative that we address the structural barriers that cause oral health disparities. Dental therapists can address these disparities by expanding and bolstering the current dental delivery system to serve these underserved communities. Dental therapy is an evidenced-based solution that has increased access to care in Alaska and Minnesota, especially for hard-to-reach populations, and can do the same in Massachusetts.

                                                                                                                                       -- Kristen McGlaston, Community Catalyst

October 31, 2017

With Halloween upon us, we are enjoying the playfulness of costumes and trick or treating. As we are passing out sweets to all the cute ghosts and dinosaurs, we should be concerned that families are wondering whether the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) will be available to their children in the coming months and years.

As of September 30, Congress allowed funding for CHIP to expire. This puts at risk health insurance coverage for nearly 9 million children, which is scary. In early October, committees in each chamber of Congress made some progress by passing similar legislative language extending CHIP funding for five years. This is an example of the longstanding bipartisan support for CHIP and is certainly something to celebrate. However, the House version of the legislation contains other policy proposals and worrisome methods of covering the costs of CHIP funding. This means that House and Senate leadership are still negotiating how to pay for CHIP, and there are clear signals that they still have not come to an agreement.

Unfortunately—despite Congress’ progress—the urgency of refunding the program is only increasing. Last week, the Georgetown Center on Children and Families released a report outlining the consequences of Congress’ delayed action. As the report notes, the children most at risk of losing coverage live in states with CHIP programs that are running out of funds more quickly. Some states like Minnesota might run out of funds as early as November while other states could run out of funds by December or early January. Arizona, California, Florida, Texas and the District of Columbia are among the states slated to run out most quickly. This means that kids could lose coverage, including a disproportionate proportion of children of color because those states enroll some of the highest percentages of children of color.

Meanwhile, making changes to CHIP takes time and states cannot complete the necessary steps moments before they exhaust their funds. Even states that estimate their funding will stretch a bit farther into 2018 have already started taking action to wind down their program. Colorado, Texas, Virginia and Washington all plan to send notices to families in December alerting them that their coverage is ending. Utah has taken an even more significant step by submitting a plan to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to close their program once they exhaust their funds.

Children, families and states need swift action to address the uncertainty around CHIP funding. Despite ongoing efforts to reach consensus on how to pay for CHIP, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy announced that he would hold a floor vote on the House’s version of the CHIP funding legislation this week. This House vote threatens the bipartisan support that CHIP has had for more than 20 years. As the House moves forward with a vote, Democratic leadership argues Republicans are pushing ahead on partisan terms rather than working together to identify ways to pay for CHIP funding that would not harm other people.

It’s not a Halloween trick; it’s true: Without Congressional reauthorization, Massachusetts will exhaust its federal Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) funds by March 2018. Here in the Commonwealth, CHIP is a part of MassHealth, along with Medicaid. Losing CHIP would be scary for the 160,000 Massachusetts children who depend on it for their health care. CHIP enables Massachusetts to provide health care coverage to children whose family incomes exceed the Medicaid eligibility standards but may not be high enough to afford private health insurance. In Massachusetts, 10% of children depend on CHIP for their health care, and 25% of children in the MassHealth program are covered by CHIP. In addition, CHIP currently provides health insurance to 7,000 expectant mothers who are not eligible for Medicaid. Without CHIP reauthorization, these mothers would lose access to prenatal care.

We must be loud and clear that Congress should pass a five-year extension of CHIP funding with bipartisan agreement on both policy and funding. Our little ghosts and goblins deserve it.

This post was written in concert with Community Catalyst

October 26, 2017

This Monday, Health Care For All testified before the Special Senate Committee on Health Care Cost Containment and Reform during a public hearing on the Senate health package (An Act furthering health empowerment and affordability by leveraging transformative health care) released the previous week. This major legislation affects a wide range of topics throughout the health care system. In our testimony, Health Care For All touched on a few of the provisions we think will impact consumers.

Major Items Highlighted by Health Care For All:

Prescription Drugs

Health Care For All supports the provision in this bill which authorizes an evidence-based education program for drug prescribers. To best prescribe to patients, doctors must keep up with a constantly evolving drug market and new clinical research. Meanwhile, the pharmaceutical industry spends billions of dollars in marketing directly to doctors, promoting new, high cost drugs even if these drugs don’t improve outcomes. This education program can help providers prescribe based on clinical data instead of promotional information.

HCFA also supports the introduction of transparency measures for prescription drug pricing. The rapidly rising cost of prescription drugs places major burdens on consumers and the state budget. However, Health Care For All urges for stronger transparency than is currently in the legislation. We believe that any information the state gathers on prices should be made available to the public, and that a substantial penalty should be levelled against any drug company that withholds pricing information.

Dental Therapists

Health Care For All strongly supports the authorization of dental therapists in this legislation. Dental therapists are mid-level providers who are trained to provide basic but vital services, including preventive dental care and basic restorative care such as filling cavities. Authorization for dental therapists will help expand these important services which too many Massachusetts residents are currently unable to access.

Another panel also testified on the importance of dental therapists. Dr. Kerry Maguire of Forsyth Kids spoke on the importance of dental therapists to increase the number of providers that can fill cavities for children, saying that currently, “if every dentist in the state picked up a dental drill and never put it down, we would still not be able to treat all the cavities out there. The problem is simply too great.”

Katherine Soal, a dental hygienist and former president of the Massachusetts Dental Hygienist Association, spoke on how dental therapists could help treat problems before they become severe. She gave the example of a patient she knew with cerebral palsy who developed an extreme dental issue and needed hospitalization, and she said that the hospitalization could have been prevented by early treatment from a dental therapist.

Maura Sullivan of The ARC of Massachusetts spoke on the benefits dental therapists could have for people with developmental disabilities. She said she has worked with the state to ensure dental therapists will have training in providing oral health care to people with these disabilities. She spoke on the difficulty she has had in finding a dentist for her own children, and said that dental therapists with this training could benefit many patients who currently have trouble finding dentists who are willing to treat individuals with developmental disabilities.

MassHealth

Health Care For All was also pleased by the decision to not include damaging provisions in this legislation. Last summer, the Governor proposed a series of MassHealth cuts that would have reduced eligibility, limited benefits, and imposed barriers to keeping coverage and continuity of care. Many of these cuts required legislative authorization, and the Senate referred the issues to this Senate special committee. The committee did not include these provisions in this legislation, which shows their disapproval of the proposed cuts.

Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund

Health Care For All commended the Senate working group for including reauthorization of the Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund in this legislation. The PWTF is a successful pilot program which promotes public health through preventive care and promotion of healthy behaviors. Public health is an extremely important area of focus as it improves quality of life and cuts down on costs. It’s generally much cheaper to invest in keeping people healthy than paying for costly care when people become sick. Health Care For All urged the Senate to include a permanent source of funding for the program in this legislation.

Hospital Readmissions

October 19, 2017

The Massachusetts Senate issued its comprehensive health care reform bill this Tuesday, and Health Care For all participated in the release of the legislation. Health Care For All’s executive director, Amy Rosenthal, spoke during the event and highlighted some of the priorities of consumers in the current system. The bill contains over 150 sections, and many elements of the bill align with the needs of consumers.

Watch our executive director's full comments on the legislation here.

Public Health and Social Determinants of Health 

The bill was put together by a Senate working group, who spoke on different aspects of the bill. Senator Jason Lewis emphasized the importance of public health, saying that “the social determinants of health are absolutely critical in determining health outcomes and health disparities.” He pointed out that promoting health outcomes also helps to decrease health costs, as healthier populations require less care.

This legislation promotes public health in several ways. It reauthorizes the Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund, a successful pilot program which promotes community disease prevention by supporting healthy behavior and increasing preventative care.

The legislation also addresses housing as an important social determinant of health by establishing a housing security task force to investigate housing programs, including prioritizing shelter beds for homeless patients discharged from emergency rooms, and by allowing housing providers and health care plans to coordinate location-based care.

Amy Rosenthal also emphasized the importance of public health, saying “We focus too much on curing people when they’re sick, and not enough on prevention and keeping them healthy.”

Telemedicine

This legislation would help promote telemedicine services by permitting the coverage of telemedicine services through MassHealth and updating requirements for commercial health plans to provide coverage for telemedicine.

Telemedicine has been proposed as a way to help increase access to services for those with limited mobility and for those who live far away from medical professionals, particularly in rural areas. Behavioral health is often considered to be one field where telemedicine may be particularly effective.

Dental Therapists

Senate Majority Leader Harriette Chandler spoke on the importance of promoting dental health. “Dental health is just as important as any other health care pursuit, but so many people in this state lack access to this service.

This legislation aims to increase access to dental health by establishing a dental therapist certification. Dental therapists are mid-level providers who are trained to provide basic but vital services, such as preventive dental care and filling cavities. This bill would allow dental therapists to deliver care in community settings, such as schools and nursing homes, which would help ensure access to populations who may have a difficult time traveling to the dentist’s office. “With dental therapists,” said Senator Chandler, “dental health services are delivered directly to those in the most need.”

Dental therapists would also help to decrease health care costs. Because they are mid-level providers with a more restricted scope of practice than dentists, dental therapists generally charge less for services than dentists do. Increasing access to preventive dental care will also help lower costs by decreasing the number of patients who utilize the emergency department for oral health issues.

Amy Rosenthal also spoke on oral health, saying that “We need to get people the oral health care that they need, and get them out of emergency departments when that’s not where they should be.”

Prescription Drug Costs

Prescription drug costs are one of the main drivers of rising health care costs, and growth in prescription drug spending is one of the most rapidly increasing parts of health care spending.

This legislation takes several steps to address these costs. The legislation increases transparency for providers and consumers. It would establish an academic detailing program to educate prescribers on drug outcomes based on medical evidence and not pharmaceutical advertisements. It would also require pharmacists to inform a consumer if the amount they are paying for a drug through insurance is higher than the direct retail rate that they would pay without insurance, which is sometimes the case due to the complex and hidden factors in drug pricing. If the price with insurance is higher, the consumer would be able to buy the drug at the lower retail rate.

The legislation would also create reports on the impact and potential cost saving of the state engaging in prescription drug bulk purchase consortiums.

Surprise Out-of-Network Billing

Amy Rosenthal said that “We need to… shut down surprise medical bills.” Surprise out-of-network billing refers to a situation where a patient is receiving care in a hospital that is in their insurance network, but is treated by a specific doctor who does not accept that insurance, resulting in an unexpected and large fee for the patient. This is a major financial stress for consumers. This legislation would guarantee that the patient would not have to pay an additional copay or deductible when this happens.

- Sean Connolly 

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