"Health Care For All" in lights on a bridge

A Healthy Blog

Massachusetts health care – wonky with a dose of reality

September 18, 2017

The effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act is back.

A legislative proposal introduced by Senators Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy to repeal Obamacare may go to a vote before the end of the month.

The Graham-Cassidy bill would end subsidies to help consumers pay for private insurance and would roll back the Medicaid expansion. States would receive lump-sum payments to put towards health care instead, but overall funding would greatly decrease. The effects of this bill would be similar to that of the other failed repeal attempts: millions would lose health insurance and health care costs would increase. This proposal would also remove important federal protections for consumers that require insurers to cover essential health benefits and to provide coverage regardless of preexisting conditions.

The bill has been picking up steam in the Senate. Senator Cassidy claims that there are already 48 Republican senators supporting it and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has reportedly announced that he will bring the bill to a vote if he believes that 50 senators back the effort.

However, there is an important timeline restriction. At the end of the month, the Senate can no longer use the reconciliation process to pass repeal; a process that currently allows the Senate Republicans to pass a bill with only 50 votes, assuming a tie-breaking vote by the Vice President. After this period, they would need 60 votes to avoid being blocked by a Democratic filibuster. 

The last repeal attempt hinged on a single vote. Putting enough pressure on key senators can completely change the outcome of repeal, so we need to apply as much pressure as possible before the end of the month. 

How you can help as a Massachusetts resident: 

Our congressional delegation is with us in the fight to protect the ACA. Senator Ed Markey and Senator Elizabeth Warren firmly oppose any attempts to repeal the ACA. You may wonder if there is anything you can do as a Massachusetts resident to block this new effort to take coverage away from millions of people nationwide. The good news is that you can still make a difference by joining our friends and family campaign!  We are urging residents in the Commonwealth to contact friends and relatives in other states and have them reach out to their own senators.

Below is a list of some of the major senators to target, and numbers to their D.C. offices. You can also tell friends and family in other states to use the dialer on https://www.savemycare.org/ They can just click on the box labeled “call your senators” and provide their zip code and phone number, and they’ll get a call that will connect them directly to their senator’s office. 

Important targets:
Alaska: Senator Lisa Murkowski: (202) 224-6665

Arizona: Senator John McCain: (202) 224-2235

Colorado: Senator Cory Gardner: (202) 224-5941

Kansas: Senator Jerry Moran (202) 224-6521

Maine: Senator Susan Collins (202) 224-2523

Nevada : Senator Dean Heller (202) 224-6244

North Carolina: Senator Thom Tillis (202) 224-6342

North Dakota: Senator John Hoeven (202) 224-2551

Ohio: Senator Rob Portman (202) 224-3353

West Virginia: Senator Shelley Moore Capito (202) 224-6472

You can also access this website www.trumpcareten.org and use the call scripts there as a guide to contact these and other senators. There is also a general call script for any senators for which the website does not have a specific script. 

We have blocked similar efforts before, and we can stop this new attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Call Now!

Republican Governors can also play a major role in influencing Senators. People who live in two states in particular are urged to call their Governor's office and ask that they express their opposition to the Graham-Cassidy bill. They are:

Maryland: Governor Larry Hogan (410) 974-3901
Vermont: Governor Phil Scott (802) 828-3333

 

September 6, 2017

Last week, both Senator Chandler and Representative Scibak spoke on WWLP news on the importance of passing legislation to ensure full dental coverage for adults on MassHealth. 

Adults on MassHealth lack coverage for several important oral health treatments, including treatment for gum disease and root canals. Legislation introduced by Rep. Schibak would restore these benefits, ensuring that Massachusetts adults relying on public insurance would have coverage for the oral health treatment they need.

Senator Chandler and Representative Schibak are committed oral health advocates in the Massachusetts legislature. 

Watch the interview here

The bill referred to in this interview, The Act to Relative to the Restoration of MassHealth Adult Dental Benefits (H. 1225), filed by Rep. Scibak, will have a hearing on September 12th from 1 – 5PM in room A-2 at the Massachusetts State House. Other important oral health-related legislation will also be heard. The public is welcome to attend this hearing, and we would appreciate your presence and support. 

August 16, 2017

August 16th - Statement on Health Care For All's Commitment to Combating Injustice

(Boston, MA) - " Health Care For All is a social justice organization committed to defending the rights of all people to affordable, quality health care regardless of race, religion or gender identity. We condemn the violence and fear mongering propagated by hate groups this past weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, as well as any discussions that stop short of calling out acts of discrimination and hatred for what they truly are.

"The effects of fear, racism and discriminatory policies have drastic and negative impacts on the health and well-being of some of our most vulnerable communities. Health Care For All is committed to combating racial disparities and injustice, and we will continue to promote inclusion, equity and compassion as both an organization and as a group of citizens working to protect the rights of all people in every way we can."

July 25, 2017

Health Care For All testified today, Tuesday, July 25th, during the public hearing held by the Joint Committee on Ways and Means and the Joint Committee on Health Care Financing on Governor Baker's proposed package of reforms to MassHealth.

We provided testimony in support for some of the Baker administration's proposals, including the authorization of dental therapists and the re-instatement of employer responsibility. However, we also expressed opposition to several reforms we found concerning, particularly policies that would disqualify over 140,000 Massachusetts residents from MassHealth, shifting them onto more expensive and less comprehensive coverage.

We have created a fact sheet detailing the specific effects these proposals would have on Massachusetts residents, which can be accessed here:

HCFA Fact Sheet

June 12, 2017

Vox just published an article reporting that the U.S. Senate is getting close to enough votes to repeal the ACA, and pass a health care plan that would be devastating for Massachusetts and the rest of the country.

 

Behind closed doors, Senate Republicans have worked out a path toward Obamacare repeal. The plans under discussion would end Medicaid expansion, causing millions of low-income Americans to lose health coverage. They may allow health insurance plans to charge higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, too.

 

In other words: The emerging bill looks a whole lot like the unpopular bill the House passed last month. It creates the same group of winners (high-income, healthier people) and the same group of losers (low-income, sicker people).

 

Read the rest of the article here.

 

This is the time to double down our efforts to stop this damaging bill from moving any further. In Massachusetts, 1.9 million people rely on MassHealth, our Medicaid program. Half of all people with disabilities, 40% of all children, two-thirds of people in low-income families, and over 60% of residents in nursing homes rely on MassHealth for their care.

 

Both MA Senators, Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey, are on the right side of the issue, but you can reach out to your relatives and acquaintances in other states, asking them to call their Senators to show their opposition to this bill.

 

Here is how:

 

Join our Friends and Family campaign!

 

June 9, 2017

Anh Vu Sawyer, Executive Director of the Southeast Asian Coalition of Central Massachusetts and Health Care For All's supporter authored an op-ed that was published today on the Worcester Telegram and Gazette. In this piece, she shares her struggle to access dental care and her take on why oral health integration is crucial to improve access to preventive care especially for the immigrant community in the state.

As I See It: Flying to Asia to see a dentist?

As a director for the Southeast Asian Coalition of Central Massachusetts, I am quite concerned about the health care disparities my constituents have been struggling with due to their cultural and language barriers. However, a recent tooth ache that almost landed me in the ER gave me an insight into one simple step that may improve people’s overall health and make healthcare accessible and effective for many, especially the Limited English Proficient populations.

In January, right before my first vacation in four years, I ended up having to get an emergency medical appointment because of a high fever. I found out that this was due to the fact that a couple of years before, two of my teeth broke. Because there was no pain at that time, it wasn’t a big deal, so I didn’t do anything about it. But less than 24 hours before my trip to Europe, one of my broken teeth became infected and I was asked to cancel my trip. “No, my husband and I have to take this trip. Many events and appointments will be cancelled if we cancel.” That’s what I told the dentist who finally gave me very strong antibiotics so that the infection didn’t spread while on vacation. But he only did that with my solemn cross-my-heart promise that I would take care of the problem immediately once I was back in the U.S.

The antibiotic had unpleasant side effects and helped me to promptly keep my promise. I went to the dentist and was told I needed two root canals among other treatments and that would cost me around $5,000. I had dental insurance, but it would only cover 10 percent of the cost. I understood then that my dental insurance wasn’t really insurance; it worked more like a discount card. This preventable infection had been not only painful for my mouth, but also for my pocket, and almost ruined my sanity (I very much needed a vacation).

I was born and raised in Vietnam but I have been in this country for over 40 years. I am an educated and accomplished woman. I lead a wonderful community-based organization in Worcester that handles almost 10,000 visits a year and helps hundreds of refugees, immigrants and low-income residents to rebuild their lives and strengthen their communities. And I am a US citizen. What a gift! I might be Americanized in many ways. But not in every way. In my culture, at least where I grew up, oral health is not a priority and you don’t go to see a dental professional unless you really have to (i.e. life or death). For many years, because of my busy schedule, being frugal, and the lack of understanding the importance of healthy teeth, I didn’t visit a dentist. And for many years, I didn’t get a regular cleaning or a checkup - “It’s OK, because I brush and floss my teeth daily,” I reasoned with myself. I had to learn my mistake the hard way.

Many of us in the immigrant community experience language, cultural and financial barriers accessing this type of preventive care. Many of my fellow immigrants forego oral health care altogether. Some go as far as traveling to their home countries to get any dental procedure because it is cheaper to travel overseas and see a dentist than crossing the street to the dental office in their neighborhood. In one of our surveys, quite a few folks mentioned the money they saved from not seeing an American dentist covered the round trip airfares that they happily used to visit families. This doesn’t make any sense.

Read the whole article here

May 16, 2017

This blog was originally published on Community Catalyst’s blog Health Policy Hub

The rise in opioid misuse has continued to receive attention across the country, and only more urgently in recent months as Republicans continue to press forward toward a repeal of the ACA with a disastrous replacement bill that makes deep cuts to the Medicaid program and would reduce or eliminate care for many people with substance use disorders. Often, the majority of this attention is on adults, who are the primary users of opioids. Less attention has been directed toward infants exposed to substances during pregnancy and who, as a result, may be born with an opioid use disorder. This condition in newborns is termed neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). 

Opioid misuse is a multi-generational issue that requires supports along the lifespan. Massachusetts is disproportionately affected, placing it second in the nation for prenatal exposure (13.7 per 1,000) after the East/South Central region of the U.S. Nationally, the rate is about five babies out of every 1,000 births. The average duration of inpatient treatment for NAS is 19 days with an average cost of $30,000, placing severe strain on health systems to support affected infants and their families. Through this lens, the Massachusetts Interagency Task Force on Newborns with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome published a highly anticipated report that provides key recommendations about how to address the current gaps in care and more deliberately address the needs of infants and parents through collaboration and coordination across health and human services.

It is worth noting that this Task Force is the product of robust advocacy by a Community Catalyst-led workgroup on NAS that included a broad array of members ranging from early intervention providers, legal advocates, child welfare advocates and children’s mental health advocates to physicians –pediatricians, obstetricians/gynecologists and medical residents. The lead children’s health advocacy partner, Children’s Health Access Coalition (CHAC), helped develop and champion legislative language in the last hours of the state’s budget deliberations in 2016 to include the revenue-neutral task force.

May 4, 2017

The US House of Representatives just voted in favor of repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The American Health Care Act will make massive cuts to Medicaid and rip up the insurance protections in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) - but we're not giving up. Now the bill moves to the Senate, where we can still win this fight. 

All Senators, regardless of their public position on AHCA, need to hear from their constituents now.

In Massachusetts, we are fortunate that our Senators Edward Markey and Elizabeth Warren are firmly opposing this effort, but we can still play an important role in stopping this madness.

We are asking residents in the Commonwealth to reach out to friends and family in other states and tell them to call their Senators.

Numerous senators have expressed reservations about the legislation - they need to hear from their constituents that this bill is bad for consumers. Our calls, emails and rallies make a difference and remain critical. You can use Community Catalyst’s Take Action Page to find the phone number for your Senators.

Talking Points for Senate:

The American Health Care Act is terrible for consumers – especially for kids, older adults, people with disabilities and low- and middle-income families. It would strip coverage from 24 million people and raise costs for millions more, and impose $839 billion in Medicaid cuts. The Senate should reject this bill and any bill that cuts coverage and raises costs.

The AHCA would:

  • Take us back to the dark days when people with pre-existing conditions like diabetes and cancer couldn’t get health insurance. The plan would allow insurers to charge more to people who are sick, leading to premium increases upwards of tens of thousands of dollars for coverage that is unlikely to meet their health care needs.

  • Allow states to get rid of the essential health benefits, which would roll back the clock to the days of skimpy plans without coverage for maternity care, substance use disorders or mental health services. This means, for example, that women would have to pay more for coverage that actually meets their health care needs.  

  • End the Medicaid expansion and slash $839 billion from Medicaid, jeopardizing care for millions of low-income seniors, people living with disabilities, children and low-income parents.

  • Hit older Americans with an age tax that would force them to pay thousands of dollars more for the health care they need.

  • Be especially bad for kids. The Medicaid block grant option would reverse a long- standing commitment to protect low-income children – it would impose $839 billion in Medicaid cuts that would put pressure on states cut benefits, roll back eligibility and deny children comprehensive preventive care needed to stay healthy.

  • Undermine efforts to address our state’s crisis of drug overdose deaths.

  • Weaken the ACA’s protections against catastrophic costs for people with employer-sponsored coverage.

  • Mean fewer people covered, weaker protections and higher costs for consumers – all to give a tax break to millionaires and corporations. This is not what your constituents want.

(Thank you Community Catalyst for your leadership!)

April 27, 2017
 
The American Health Care Act (AHCA) was first introduced by House Speaker Paul Ryan on March 20th, 2017. The latest proposal keeps all of the bad features of AHCA, such as the $880 billion cuts to Medicaid and plans to strip more than 20 million people of their health insurance. Added to that it would allow states to gut the main consumer protections of the ACA and return to a time when insurers could discriminate against those living with preexisting conditions – charging them higher premiums and selling them plans that don’t meet their health needs by limiting benefits and increasing out-of-pocket costs.
 

Even though Congress is trying to avert a government shutdown, the health care debate remains critically important as Speaker Ryan roams the halls looking for votes in support of his bad bill.

We have a real chance to stop this. 
 
In Massachusetts, our congressional delegation has already committed to defend our gains in health care, but we can still make a difference in this battle. 
 
We're asking everyone to please contact your friends and family who live in states with Republican US representatives. You need to ask them to get in touch with their members of Congress to ensure that they don't support this dangerous bill!
 

 

Tell them how health reform has been a success, and direct them to http://bit.ly/CallCongressCC

Thank you to our partner organization Community Catalyst for the information, resources, and leadership they provide in this fight. 
March 10, 2017

Yesterday, HCFA, along with dozens of advocates, providers, faith leaders, and consumers gathered in Boston’s historic Old South Church to protest the proposed Republican plan to dismantle Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Speakers included:

  • Rev. John Edgerton, Associate Minister, Old South Church of Boston; Member, Greater Boston Interfaith Organization
  • Hannah Frigand, Associate Director, HelpLine, Enrollment and Education, Health Care For All
  • Sheila Belin, Health Care Worker at Boston Medical Center, 1199SEIU Member
  • Eric Fleegler, MD, MPH, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Kathy Paul, Massachusetts Senior Action Council
  • James S. Gessner, MD,  President, Massachusetts Medical Society
  • Nassira Nicola, Boston Center for Independent Living
  • Elizabeth Mooney, Southeast and Metrowest Regional Coordinator for the Massachusetts Organization for Addiction Recovery (MOAR)
  • Dennis Heaphy, Disability Policy Consortium
  • Jennifer Childs-Roshak, MD, MBA, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts

You can read highlights of their remarks here.

Both in Massachusetts and across the nation, a broad coalition of stakeholders has emerged in fierce opposition to the Republican plan, entitled the American Health Care Act (AHCA). The opposition includes health insurers, hospitals, nurses, doctors, patients, consumer advocates, community organizations, faith organizations, groups representing people with disabilities, senior groups, and even an executive from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The unanimous opposition of all these groups, which represent the full spectrum of health care stakeholders, is stunning – and telling.

The fact is that the AHCA would have devastating consequences across the entire nation, and Massachusetts would be particularly hard hit.  The provisions in the Republican legislation would decrease coverage and increase health care costs for consumers and the Commonwealth. The AHCA reduces federal assistance to low and middle income people for purchasing health insurance, eliminates cost-sharing protections included in the ACA, and rolls back the state’s Medicaid expansion, threatening coverage for over 300,000 Massachusetts residents.

Additionally, the Republican plan calls for capping Medicaid funds, which would result in the loss of billions of federal dollars used by the state to offer health coverage to the state’s most vulnerable residents. This radical change to Medicaid would place an enormous financial burden on Massachusetts and directly threaten benefits and coverage for 650,000 Massachusetts children, 170,000 seniors and 280,000 people with disabilities.

Much of what is contained in the Republican proposal is outrageous, but there is no doubt that most egregious of all is the theft of health care from the poorest Americans to line the pockets of the very richest among us. Reverend John Edgerton, an Associate Minister at Old South Church, a Greater Boston Interfaith Organization member, put it best yesterday, “This plan disregards the right of poor people to access care they can afford, while slanderously claiming that if they lose coverage it will be because of irresponsible spending. If this plan is passed, it will ruin people financially. But worse than that, people who might have remained healthy will get sick. People who might have survived will die."

Every voice counts in this fight to defend Medicaid and the ACA. We urge Massachusetts residents to call Governor Baker, Senators Markey and Warren, and your Representative in Congress. Thank them for all they have done to protect health coverage for the people of Massachusetts. Click here for more ways to get involved.

Pages