A Healthy Blog

Massachusetts health care — wonky, with a healthy dose of reality

One Step Closer to Closing the SNAP Gap

One Step Closer to Closing the SNAP Gap

May 6, 2016

Closing the SNAP Gap is a top priority for the Healthy Food, Healthy Homes, Healthy Children (HHH) Coalition and Health Care For All and we were thrilled to see Children’s HealthWatch’s letter to the editor in the Boston Globe on the importance a combined MassHealth/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) application.

What is the SNAP Gap? The difference between 1.356 million MassHealth enrollees who are likely SNAP eligible and the 785,000 MassHealth enrollees actually receiving SNAP.1 Or, to put it another way: Roughly 570,000 MassHealth enrollees who are likely eligible for, but not receiving SNAP benefits.

 

Common app needed for MassHealth and SNAP

MAY 06, 2016

We are glad to see the Globe acknowledge the need to better coordinate health care (“A necessary prescription for MassHealth,” April 29). Hopefully, accountable care will lead to both healthier patients and cost savings. We recommend an additional prescription.

Permitting low income families to file for both Mass-Health and the federally-funded nutrition (SNAP) benefits simultaneously is key. A common application would reduce administrative red tape for families and improve the health of young children. Children’s HealthWatch research shows that young children enrolled in MassHealth who received SNAP were more likely to be food-secure and in better health than children eligible for, but not receiving, SNAP.

Many families eligible for one public assistance benefit are often eligible for others as well. A comparison of SNAP and MassHealth data by the Mass Law Reform Institute suggests a “SNAP Gap” of roughly 600,000 very low-income MassHealth recipients eligible for SNAP but not enrolled. This is due, in part, to difficulties navigating multiple government agencies. Families often submit duplicate documentation to access a disjointed patchwork of programs. Massachusetts should seize the opportunity and offer families a common application portal.

Dr. Megan Sandel

Richard Sheward

Children’s HealthWatch, Boston

 

Massachusetts is a national leader in health services and access to care, but staying well requires more than health insurance. SNAP significantly decreases families’ food insecurity which is an established health hazard that can lead to poor health and hoptilizations.2 Research shows that SNAP improves health outcomes and reduces health costs.3

SNAP is a 100% federally funded benefit. Over 500,000 Massachusetts residents are eligible for but not receiving SNAP. MA is leaving federal dollars on the table that could be feeding low income Massachusetts residents and improving their health.

Under the leadership of Representative Livingstone, and advocacy from the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute and HHH Coalition, the House budget included   an amendment to study the feasibility of creating this combined application. We will work through the Senate budget process to further push this important effort forward.

 

1 October 2015: EOHHS reported 1.8 million Masshealth enrollees, DTA reported 785K SNAP enrollees. Of the 1.8M Masshealth enrollees, 200,000 were “temporarily enrolled.”  MLRI evaluated Masshealth and SNAP participation data for October 2015. MLRI determined the “likely SNAP eligible” by counting Masshealth enrollees under 200% FPL in Masshealth Standard, CarePlus, and Commonhealth, and excluding temporarily enrolled, long term care and immigrant ineligibles.

2 Children’s Health Watch, The SNAP Vaccine: Boosting Children’s Health, February 2012, pp.1-2

3 Gunderson, Craig and Ziliak, James P., Food Insecurity and Health Outcomes, Health Affairs, 34, no. 11 (2015), pp.1830-9.